gorillaprutt:

You decide what he’s saying

(Danny Sexbang, Game grumps)

(via melonberries)

kingmunsterxvii:

febricant:

SHIA LEBEOUF LIVE

THIS IS NOT A DRILL

The entire history of art has been leading to this monumental moment

(via naschamsant)

guitarandmtndew:

this show is fucking gold
guitarandmtndew:

this show is fucking gold

guitarandmtndew:

this show is fucking gold

(via seasaltinquisition)

sketchlock:

callmeoutis:

calmb4tehpwn:

rasputinberries:

I love this contest

LAYS MISERABLES

THAT TOOK ME TOO LONG

ok FINE i’ll reblog this one i hope you’re proud of yourselves

image

(via alphakantspell)

mangalho:

you dont even know

(via jannelle-o)

suchanartist13:

Yea… SAIL by Awolnation. 

(via madhatterlupin)

aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R
aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR 

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R

aonootaku:

leia-reon:

i-am-a-mushroom:

tiredwinchesters:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

THAT IS NOT THE INTENDED USE, SIR

SPRAY IT ON YOUR NIPPLES

U L T I M A T E N I P P L E S

T H A T I S N O T T H E I N T E N D E D U S E S I R

(via espruen)

possiblespy:

If you’ve ever played TF2’s Mann vs. Machine mode, you’ll likely have noticed that there’s a “meta” team composition that most teams of random players gravitate towards, a team that includes a diverse range of classes to cover every role required for killing robots.

The other day, I was in a group that was all like “NOPE, IT’S MEDICINE TIME.” We beat an advanced map with three medics, only missing a single credit bonus when our scout left.

Medics one and two each had the stock medigun and an ubersaw, and took turns making each other invulnerable so they could go build up another uber with the saw.

Medic three had the quickfix, and used the quicker healing and shield to make sure no one stayed dead.

Scout grabbed money, Engineer caught stray robots and supplied more damage, and Soldier buffed our syringes and shields up to a level that took down tanks.

(via tf2-daesdemona)

ducktheripper:

"Why isn’t this a real thing?"

image

(via pybotic)

polar-bite:

clientsfromhell:

Client: Do you do lemonade?

Me: Do we do… lemonade?

Client: Yes, I was told you do that here.

Me: I’m sorry, this is a graphics and print shop.

Client: I know that. I’m not an idiot. 

Me: I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to -  

Client: Look If you can’t lemonade these papers for me then I’ll go somewhere else!

Me: Do you mean… laminate?

RETAIL

(via madhatterlupin)

actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked
actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked

actuallyahedgehog:

mewtripled:

this happened to me in class on monday

i found myself wearing a lot of black so i’d always point to my white sneakers when people asked

(via peteykins)

501rst:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.
The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.
The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.
As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.
My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.
I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.
These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.
Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.
The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.
You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

This is wonderful
501rst:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.
The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.
The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.
As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.
My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.
I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.
These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.
Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.
The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.
You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

This is wonderful

501rst:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

This is wonderful

(via peteykins)

frickhead:

ATTENTION EVERYONE IN THE LA AREA!!

My cousin, TALLON, was reported MISSING today. He is an AUTISTIC BLACK TEEN AND IS COMPLETEY NON-VERBAL. HE DOES NOT RESPOND TO HIS NAME. This young man went out for his daily bike ride, unattended, and did not come back. Tonight, HE IS IN LA BY HIMSELF. He is 6’0, 200lbs, and was last seen wearing a white t shirt and khaki shorts. PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST!!

(via la-volpe-blu)


Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.
September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.
September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.
September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.
September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.
September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.
September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

Valuing life is not weakness. And disregarding it is not strength.

Rest in Peace, Elizabeth Peña.

September 23, 1959 - October 14, 2014

(via amespookle)

Running on The Default Network
by Boyce